Kaiser Health News Morning Briefing: Diseases Spread by Ticks, Mosquitoes and Fleas Reaching ‘Astronomical Levels’!

The Kaiser Health News’ KHN Morning Briefing is a great resource which provides summaries of health policy coverage from major news organizations. 

As summer approaches, and with more will be people spending more time outdoors, one topic of particular interest, titled “Diseases Spread by Ticks, Mosquitoes and Fleas Reaching ‘Astronomical Levels’”, reports that the number of vector-born diseases has increased significantly. The number of people contracting diseases transmitted via bites from mosquitos, ticks and fleas has more than tripled in recent years.

As stated in their recent morning briefing:

“The CDC report shows the number of reported cases of vector-borne diseases jumped from 27,388 cases in 2004 to more than 96,000 cases in 2016. Officials say there’s no need to hide indoors, but people should be vigilant, especially with children.”

Take a minute to read some of the articles noted below that the KHN Morning Briefing shared from The New York Times; The Washington Post; and Georgia Health News, among others.

The New York Times: Tick And Mosquito Infections Spreading Rapidly, C.D.C. Finds 

Farewell, carefree days of summer. The number of people getting diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in the United States in recent years, federal health officials reported on Tuesday. Since 2004, at least nine such diseases have been discovered or newly introduced here. (McNeil, 5/1)

The Washington Post: Diseases Spread By Ticks, Mosquitoes And Fleas More Than Tripled In The U.S. Since 2004 

A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that illnesses from mosquito, tick and flea bites more than tripled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. The report, released Tuesday, shows that the number of reported cases of these diseases jumped from 27,388 cases in 2004 to more than 96,000 cases in 2016. The data includes illnesses reported in U.S. states and territories. During that period, more than 640,000 cases of these diseases were reported to the CDC. (Sun, 5/1)

The Hill: CDC Says Bug-Borne Illnesses On The Rise  

“Zika, West Nile, Lyme and chikungunya — a growing list of diseases caused by the bite of an infected mosquito, tick or flea — have confronted the U.S. in recent years, making a lot of people sick,” CDC Director Robert Redfield said in a statement. “And we don’t know what will threaten Americans next.” (Wilson, 5/1)

The New York Times: How To Protect Yourself From Mosquitoes And Ticks 

Just when you thought it was warm enough to venture outdoors again, health officials are warning that the number of Americans infected by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled in recent years. Tick-borne diseases like Lyme and Rocky Mountain spotted fever have been increasing in the Northeast, Upper Midwest and California, and mosquitoes may be carrying West Nile virus and, in some parts of the United States, Zika. The only flea-borne disease is plague, but it, thankfully, is extremely rare. (Rabin, 5/1)

Miami Herald: Climate Change Could Bring More Mosquitoes And Zika To Miami 

Mosquito season has officially arrived in Florida, although many would argue it never left. That perception may soon become reality, according to new studies that show the higher temperatures brought on by climate change are already increasing the range and biting season for many mosquitoes, including the Aedes aegypti — the infamous carriers of viruses like dengue and Zika, which hit Miami hard enough in 2016 to scare off many tourists. (Harris, 5/1)

Georgia Health News: Mosquitoes, Ticks And Fleas Are Spreading More Sickness, CDC Reports 

The number of Americans getting diseases transmitted by mosquito, tick and flea bites has more than tripled over a 12-year period, reaching more than 96,000 cases in 2016, the CDC reported Tuesday. Such “vector-borne’’ diseases include Zika, West Nile, Lyme and chikungunya. (Miller, 5/1)

The Star Tribune: CDC Shows Minnesota As Hot Spot For Tick-Related Illnesses  

Insect-borne diseases have tripled in the United States since 2004, and Minnesota has emerged as an epicenter of tick-related illnesses. With 26,886 confirmed cases of tick-borne infections between 2004 and 2016, Minnesota had the seventh-highest tally in the U.S., according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Olson, 5/2)